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Archive for April, 2015

leadFrom one of the great writers Amartya Sen’s Development as a Freedom – he states that what people can positively achieve is influenced by economic opportunities, political liberties, social powers and the enabling conditions of good health, basic education and the encouragement and cultivation of initiatives…and in line with the presence of massive unemployment entails the deprivations that are not well reflected in income distribution statistics.

Unemployment contributes to the social exclusion of some groups and it leads to losses of self-reliance, self-confidence and psychological and physical health( As seen (more…)

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Several children are kidnapped every year, usually to be used as sacrificial rituals.

Several children are kidnapped every year, usually to be used as sacrificial rituals.

Child sacrifice and mutilation have in the past decade proven to be sadly on the rise in Uganda. Each year, uncountable number of children are murdered on the command of traditional healers.
This is commonly practiced when a helpless child’s body parts, most often the heads, ears, livers, and tongues are cut off. In the end, many of the child survivors carry with them grave life scars and injuries, including thorough genital mutilations; deep wound stabs, missing tongues, ears, as well as psychological scars that require a life time healing.

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One of the biggest challenges faced in the health sector is the difficulty experienced in managing Human Resources for Health (HRH), amidst undersupply of healthcare workers. Outright scarcity of health care professionals especially in a developing country like Uganda is primarily due to under investment in human capital for health.
Whilst the Ugandan government has registered progress in approving and filling posts for required health facility staffing, undersupply is prevalent, and staffing rate has persistently remained below national target in the Health Sector Strategic and (more…)

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I drop my girls at school at 7am and collect them 10 and a half hours later. Our travel from home to school never lasts less than half an hour and our return in the evening takes at least one hour as the traffic is heavier then. The time between departure in the morning and home-coming in the evening comprises altogether 12 hours as a minimum. The other half of the day is for morning and evening bathing, breakfast, supper, family, sleep and homework.

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Giving birth to triplets almost feels like a curse if you look at the past three stories that have run in Daily Monitor concerning them. First on February 25, we reported about a woman in Kasese, Jane Kabugho, who had hardly anything to feed her children on, as she had no steady income, her relatives could not help much and the father of the children could not afford to give her anything.
About a month later, on March 27, we reported about another mother of triplets in Bushenyi, Mary Madamu, who had given birth to triplets prematurely and who was likely to face hardships when she left the hospital as she and her husband could hardly afford to take care of them.

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“[From] 1960s up to early 80s, our hilltops that you see bare today, were beautifully and intensely covered with trees. We used to cultivate our crops and graze our animals mainly in lowland areas, and not near this river banks as you see now. This has since, however, changed due to population increase. This has [forced] locals to cultivate their crops adjacent to river banks in an attempt to cultivate large areas and produce more food for their growing families. They are also excessively cutting down trees on hills for firewood and building materials, and in doing so, contributing to the loss of vegetation cover. This results into soils being washed downwards into River Kagera, and finally into Lake Victoria, thus contributing to the health hazards for the people who use water from the lake.”

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Reports of homes and institutions, especially in rural areas and slums in urban areas that do not have toilets or properly constructed pit-latrines, are not new. However, common occurrence does not lessen the severity of poor hygiene. With lack of toilets, human waste is disposed of in polythene bags that are dumped in the bushes, roadsides, or even at water sources. This subsequently leads to outbreaks of diseases that thrive due to poor hygiene such as dysentery, cholera, typhoid, and diarrhoea.
These outbreaks often get out of hand, causing avoidable deaths; the recent typhoid outbreak in Kampala and neighbouring districts being a good example. And now that the rainy season is here, it is important to promote sanitation as a key preventive measure. (more…)

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