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Archive for September, 2014

As a representative of a growing, multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-generational, multi-ideological constituency, I have a task of harmonizing a diverse As a global citizen, I feel at ease with Kampala residents, even those that hold divergent views and beliefs different from mine. As an activist stemming from my work in the Women’s movement, I know that the basis of human rights is simplified in the 1948 United Nations Declarations on Human Rights.

Over the years as the member of parliament of Kampala, I’ve engaged and interacted with diverse people, being insightfully aware of their peculiarities and proud of my culture, religion but at the same time, I accept other cultures and religions and keep my orientation focused on the make up the Kampala polity. (more…)

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Ssebandeke-AshrafRecently, a Ugandan daily newspaper carried a headline that a cure for sickle cell disease had been found.

This gave a lot of hope to many people who are suffering from, and those who have children with the disease. I personally received a number of phone calls and emails; my Facebook wall was filled with messages informing me of a sickle cell medical breakthrough, while others were congratulating me.

My friend, a mother to a son with sickle cell disease, also got numerous calls. Her friends and relatives were asking her (more…)

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Couple-kissing read somewhere that: “Love needs something to burn, or else it will fall away like an unfed fire”.

So, what does your love burn?

Children, milestones achieved together, challenges overcome as a couple, even angry breakups and makeups, can all contribute to being the charcoal that makes the fire in your marriage burn bright. Yet all of these things cannot be constants that keep the fire burning. Yes, a child can bring immense joy to a marriage, but after a while, even that may not stop the embers from dying out.

A beautiful house you built together can cause quite its share of ecstasy, especially if you are naughty enough to initiate each room in quite sexy ways before the rest of the family moves in…wink-wink. (more…)

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Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda

Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda

As the United States keeps up its attack against ISIS terrorists in Syria and Iraq, African leaders are trying to figure out the best solution to tackle extremism in their region.

Uganda Prime Minister-Designate Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda told FoxNews.com the threat of Islamic extremism “is a real problem” facing his country.

In 2010, al-Shabaab, a Somali-based jihadist group, carried out two terror attacks in the country’s capital, Kampala. The attacks killed 79 people, including one American. (more…)

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Dear Doctor: I started my periods at the age of eight. But when it comes, it is in the form of blood clots. I have used herbs without success. What should I do? Ahabwe

Dear Ahabwe: Precocious puberty is when a child’s body begins changing into that of an adult (puberty) too soon. In such a case, a girl who is below the age of eight may start to grow breasts and get her periods.

It is, therefore, normal to start periods at the age of eight. It is common that adolescents experience heavy periods during the first few years of menstruation due to fluctuations in their sex hormones, resulting from lack of ovulation.

Heavy periods may, therefore, result in blood clots. While it may be possible to treat the hormonal imbalances with birth control pills or other hormones, it is necessary to investigate and rule out other causes.

Taking food supplements and herbs, especially when they do not target the cause of the problem is likely to lead to delay in management of the problem. Please visit your doctor for help.

http://www.monitor.co.ug/Magazines/Health—Living/I-started-my-periods-at-the-age-of-8/-/689846/2444612/-/am8fasz/-/index.html

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In 2013, a UN report said one in four children under five years across the world – a total of 165 million – were stunted, while last year The Lancet estimated that undernutrition contributed 45 per cent of all under five deaths.

Often beginning in the womb as poverty-stricken mothers live hand-to-mouth, stunting can be a lifelong affliction. Studies show it is linked to poor cognition and educational performance, low adult wages and lost productivity.

(more…)

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Uganda has ratified a number of international and regional treaties and conventions including the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) which legally obliges the state to protect the rights of all children, including those in conflicts and in contact with the law.
At national level, the Children’s Act Cap. 59 has in place full safeguards for the rights of all children in the country. The adoption of the Children’s Act was a giant stride in harmonising the national laws with international treaties which Uganda has signed and ratified. The Act was also meant to shield children from all forms of abuse. Child abuse consists of any act of commission or omission that endangers or impairs a child’s physical or emotional health and development.

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